Archive:The Descendants of John Whitney, page 536

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The Descendants of John Whitney, Who Came from London, England, to Watertown, Massachusetts, in 1635, by Frederick Clifton Pierce (Chicago: 1895)

Transcribed by the Whitney Research Group, 1999.


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536 WHITNEY GENEALOGY.

the purest, one of the noblest men I ever knew. He was in the highest sense a deeply religious man - that is to say, he lived in accordance with his ideal. There was about him neither cant nor hypocrisy. He did not pretend to be better than others - he wished only to make others better. While I knew him, his entire time was occupied in doing good to others. He was a perpetual consolation to the sick and wounded - an example for all. He won the respect of every man who knew him, and his influence was only good. He as truly gave his life for his country, as though he had died on the field of battle. Yours truly, R. G. INGERSOLL. Mr. WHITNEY died in the prime of life, died regretted and mourned by the popu- lation of an entire city, died without an enemy, and his loss was an irreparable one. The admirers and appreciators of Mr. WHITNEY were not confined to his society. He had frequent hearers from other denominations. His efforts were mostly argu- ments. He had a natural gift in argument, which may have been confirmed by his study of law. This style was attractive to inquirers outside of his immediate people. As a preacher he was far above the average. His power was the result of great ability coupled with evident sincerity. He never descended to hair splitting niceties, but always grasped the vital questions touching the subject in hand. He had no patience with arguments founded on isolated passages of Scripture. He died June 12, 1862; res. Keokuk, Ia. 8239. i. HARWOOD OTIS, b. Apr. 17, 1844; m. Helen J. HAY. 8240. ii. CHAS. EDMUND, b. Oct. 5, 1846; d. Feb. 9, 1864. 8241. iii. LEONARD S., b. June 20, 1850; d. young. 8242. iv. JENNETT, b. Feb. 7, 1858; d. Oct. 16, 1858. 8243. v. CARLETON P., b. Sept. 8, 1860; unm.; res. Keosauqua, Ia. 5120. EDMUND WHITNEY (Otis, Aaron, Nathan, Nathan, Thomas, Thomas, John), b. Williston, Vt., Nov. 5, 1818; m. at Montpelier, Vt., May 1, 1839, Esther FLAGG, b. Sept. 10, 1820; d. June 14, 1862; m. 2d Mary Elizabeth SEATON. He is a farmer; res. Williston, Vt. 8244. i. HENRY OTIS, b. Dec. 26, 1840; d. Mar. 1, 1869. 8245. ii. WM. F., b. Oct. 27, 1842; m. Zeruah F. BROWNELL. 8246. iii. ELLEN JOSEPHINE, b. Jan. 4, 1845; m. Jan. 10, 1875, Dr. Isaac D. ALGER; res. Minneapolis, Minn. Ch.: Edmund Whitney, b. June, 1877. 8247. iv. EDMUND B., b. June 19, 1848; m. Juliet HOOD. 8248. v. ZENAS B., b. Dec. 25, 1853; m. Alida PORTER. 5122. SOLON WHITNEY (Chester, Aaron, Nathan, Nathan, Thomas, Thomas, John), b. Waterbury, Vt., 1810; m. Lucy B. NOBLE; m. 2d Emeline BUTLER; d. 1852.

Otis Whitney, Pierce, p. 536.jpg

OTIS WHITNEY.

He was born in Waterbury, Vt., about 1810, and moved from that state to Illinois about 1835, where he was engaged in farming near Shockoken, in Henderson county, across the Mississippi river from Burlington, Ia. He also owned a steam ferryboat and was engaged in ferrying the Cali- fornia emigrants across the river at that place in an early day. His first wife died childless soon after marriage. He died in 1851, leaving a widow and several small children, viz., Chester, Otis and Emeline. In 1853 the children went to live with their uncle Baxter in Vermont. He d. 1851; res. Shockoken, Ill. 8249. i. ELISHA GREEN, b. -----; d. young. 8250. ii. MARY, b. -----; d. young. 8251. iii. CHESTER, b. 1840; d. 1857; injured by falling on the ice. 8252. iv. AMELIA, b. -----; d. young. 8253. v. OTIS, b. Apr. 30, 1847; res. unm. Cos- mopolis, Wash. He was born in Shockoken, Ill. His father dying when he was young he went to live with his uncle Baxter in Vermont. There he resided until 1866, when he moved to Riley, Kan. In 1868 he engaged in farming on his own account. In the spring of 1873 he started

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