Family:Whitney, Joshua (1773-1845)

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Gen. Joshua7 Whitney (Joshua6, Thomas5, William4, William3, Joshua2, John1), son of Joshua6 and Hannah (Green) Whitney, born 24 Aug 1773, and died 13 Apr 1845, Binghamton, NY.

He married firstly, Rhoda Jewell, daughter of David and Martha (Grant) Jewell. She was born about 1771, Clarendon, VT, and died 21 Jan 1823.

He married secondly, 20 Sep 1827, Rye, NY, Julia Anna Crooker, daughter of William and Anna (Hudson) Crooker. She was born about 1790, Rye, NY, and died 11 Mar 1874.

He was known as General Whitney. When about 20 years of age he was sent by his father from Binghamton to Philadelphia with a drove of cattle, 17 in number. Part of his way was through a wilderness with nothing but marked trees to direct his path. He went alone, starting late in the fall. He drove to Great Bend, thence through the Nine Partners to Hop Bottom on Tunkhannock creek, and thence to Thorn Bottom. The cattle subsisted often by browsing in the forests. He next reached Wilkesbarre and he drove thence to a branch of the Lehigh near Pocano Mountain, where his cattle were poisoned by eating laurel, on account of which he suspended his journey for over a week and then proceeded to Wind Gap and Nazareth to Philadelphia. There he sold the cattle and purchased mercantile goods which he placed upon Pennsylvania wagons and transported to Middletown, PA, on the Susquehanna. There he put them on what was called a Durham boat pushed by six hands, and they were thus carried 255 miles to Owego, most of the distance against a strong current. Often young Whitney was obliged to be midway in the water, amid cakes of floating ice for hours together. He reached Owego a little before Christmas. [Annals of Binghamton, VI.] Previous to the erection of this county, Binghamton (then Chenango Point) was a half shire town of Tioga County and courts were held at the house of J. Whitney until 1802, in which year a court house was erected (page 65). In speaking of Binghamton, originally known as Chenango Point, its present name was given in honor of William Bingham, who purchased a large tract of land lying on both sides of the Susquehanna, including the site of the city and to whose beneficence in donating land for the erection of county buildings and a public school, and to the liberal and enlightened exertions of his agent, Gen. Whitney, its early prosperity is largely due (p. 82). During the same year (1787) came Joshua and William Whitney and Henry Green from Hillsdale, Columbia County, and settled on the west side of the Chenango on what was afterward called Whitney flat (p. 93). Thomas Chambers erected and lived in a log house on the site of the city. Other settlements were made here and a postoffice established 23 Jun 1798, with Joshua Whitney as postmaster. Up to the beginning of the present century, however, little disposition to occupy the site of the city was manifested, the early settlers being diverted to the Chenango village, a prosperous settlement on the west side of the Chenango about one mile above Binghamton, etc. In 1800 Joshua Whitney became the agent of Mr. Bingham for the disposal of the latter's lands in this vicinity, and as the whole of the side of the village just alluded to was not embraced in Mr. Bingham's patent, and it had neither the advantage of as eligible a location nor possessed a sufficiently extensive area for the growth of a village such as might be built up at the junction of the two rivers, Mr. Whitney conceived the idea of diverting attention to the latter place and removing the village there. As a means to this end he took advantage of reports, which were circulated to the effect that Lucas Elmendorf, of Kingston, Ulster County, was about to build a bridge across the Chenango on the line of the great western highway which passed through the site of Binghamton and represented that it must determine the prosperity of settlers in its locality and cause a corresponding decline in the growth of the upper village. He accordingly, in company with several others who came by appointment, commenced a clearing on both sides of the river at the point where he represented the bridge was to be located. The ground was surveyed and laid out into streets and lots in village form the same year. To render the success of his plan more certain, Gen. Whitney purchased a number of buildings in the old village and removed them to the new one. By this means the nucleus of a village was formed and its prosperity assured. New accessions were rapidly made, but the bridge was not built till 1808. The bridge was rebuilt in 1825 by Colonel H. Lewis as master builder under the direction of Joshua Whitney at a cost of over $3,000. On each side of the river, at the ends of this bridge, stood a fine elm tree, and the two were long known as the twin elms (page 95.)

Children of Joshua7 and Rhoda (Jewell) Whitney:

i. Pamela8 Whitney, b. 12 Apr 1794; d. 1 Oct 1864; m. 22 Aug 1813, Hon. Thomas G. Waterman; resided Binghamton. Mr. Waterman was born in the city of New York on the 22d day of January, 1788, and while yet a child removed with his parents to Salisbury, in the state of Connecticut, where his father, David Waterman, established valuable and extensive iron works. At the age of 14 he entered Yale college, in the same class with James Fenimore Cooper and other men of note, whose friendship he retained through after years. He graduated with much distinction, and studied law at the celebrated law school in Litchfield, CT, and subsequently with the Hon. Samuel Sherwood, then of Delhi, NY, and in 1809 was admitted to practice in the supreme court of New York, and in the spring of 1813 removed to Binghamton, where, being introduced to the family of Gen. Joshua Whitney, he was, in the ensuing August, united in marriage with the General's eldest daughter, Miss Pamela Whitney, and made his permanent home in that beautiful place, just then reclaimed from the wilderness and hardly yet a village. Mr. Waterman's practice grew to be both lucrative and extensive, and he became one of the most leading and influential men in that section of the state. In 1826 he was elected member of assembly for the county of Broome, and in the four succeeding years he represented, in the senate of the state, the senatorial district of which that county formed a part; and during this term of service he took an active and influential part in the important work of the Revised Statutes of the state. After this period, though repeatedly urged to do so, he persistently refused to become again a candidate for political office; although, by appointment of the governor, he fulfilled the duties of a judge of the common pleas in his own county and of a general of brigade in the militia of the state. He took an active interest, however, in all that concerned the welfare of the nation and the state. He was a friend of Jackson, Van Buren, and Marcy, and of the political party which they represented, until the onslaught on the national bank and the finances of the country forced him, with many others, to follow the standard of Henry Clay and their newly inaugurated Whig party, to which he adhered until the pro-slavery spirit threatened to subjugate all that was left of freedom in the land. He then became a Republican and so continued to be to the end. And to the support of the cause which he espoused, he, at all times, gave liberally of his own money, and his time and influence. And he was no less remarkable for his liberal contributions to all the charitable and religious undertakings of his neighbourhood, and for his extraordinary and increasing kindness to the poor and unfortunate. The Broome Republican, published at Binghamton, commemorates him as one "without a vice or an approach to a vice--a model of truth, probity, and honor--kind, amiable, and benevolent, yet full of decision and firmness--with a clear, good judgement, a strong sense of duty, and a laborious and indefatigable spirit in discharging its obligations." A good man and a faithful citizen, he has gone to his rest, sincerely, deeply, and universally regretted by all who knew him. [New York. Tribune.]
ii. Virgil Whitney, b. 5 Feb 1796; m. Marcia L. Doty.
iii. Vincent Whitney, b. 12 Apr 1799; m. Susan Harper.
iv. George Whitney, b. 12 Aug 1801; m. Sophia Silk Evans.
v. Washington Whitney, b. 22 Jul 1803; m. Caroline Park.
vi. Franklin Whitney, b. 22 Jul 1803; m. Eliza Cameron.
vii. Joshua Whitney, b. 19 Dec 1806; d. 3 May 1891, Binghamton, NY; m. Zara S. Evans.
viii. Rhoda Whitney, b. 14 Apr 1808, d. 4 Aug 1808.
ix. William Wallace Whitney, b. 28 Sep 1810; m. Myra Clark.
x. Mary Amelia Whitney, b. 2 Oct 1812; d. Binghamton, NY.
xi. Charles Whitney, b. 21 Apr 1815; d. Binghamton, NY; m. Emily Clark.
xii. Robert Whitney, b. 21 Apr 1818; d. 7 Jun 1819.

Census

2369 2464 Julia Whitney 60 F W New York Mary Baker 14 F " " Attended school Edgar Barber 16 M " Student " Attended school Bridget Cromy 18 F " Ireland John W. Brown 13 M B South C.

436 Frame $10000 536 Julia Whitney 64 F - - Green Co. - 1 30 - - - - - - 1 - Mary E. Baker 19 F - Brdr Green - - 10 None - - - - - - - Julia W. Leonard 14 F - Niec Green Co. - - 6m - - - - - - - - Julia Murry 17 F - Srvt In Delewarem - - 9 None - - - - - - - John Harrison 65 M B Srvt Virginia - - 11 - - - - - - - - 537 A. Elmira Ulshaffer 26 F - - Albany - - 2 Tailors. - - - - - - - Susan Ulshaffer 25 F - Sist Albany - - 2 Tailors. - - - - - - - Christina Ulshaffer 21 F - Sist Albany - - 2 Tailors. - - - - - - - Anna Medow 24 F - Brdr Pennsylvania - - 1 Tolk[??] - - - - - - -

422 Brick $25000 Exchange Hotel 512 James B. Boodle 35 M - - Orange 1 - 2 - - - - - - 1 - Elisabeth S. Boodle 33 F - Wife Tompkins 1 - 2 - - - - - - - - Margaret J. Boodle 10 " - Chld do - - 2 - - - - - - - - Abner L. Boodle 8 M - " do - - 2 - - - - - - - - Ellen E. Boodle 1 F - " Broome - - 1 - - - - - - - - S. L. Guion 33 M - Brdr Weschester 1 - 4 Clerk 1 - - - - - - Sherman Harris 26 " - " Putnam - - 4 Bar Tender 1 - - - - - - Danl. Hallen 21 " - Srvt Ireland - - 2 Porter - - 1 - - - - Harry Carl 15 " - " Broome - - 15 do - - - - - - - Michael Simpson 25 " - " Ireland - - 1 Ostler - 1 - - - - - Julia Simpson 21 F - " do - - 1 - - - - - - - - Stephen Hoffman 21 M - " Broome - - 18 Porter 1 - - - - - - Sarah Snook 20 F - " Broome - - 20 - - - - - - - - Kate Moody 20 " - " Ireland - - 5 - - - 1 - - - - Sarah Shaw 40 " - " France - 1 3 - - - 1 - - - - Ellen Clark 19 " - " Ireland - - 5 - - - 1 - - - - Bridget Clancey 25 " - " do - - 2 - - - 1 - - - - Maria Slatterly 21 " - " do - - 3 - - - 1 - 1 - - Johanna Dorhorety 23 " - " do - - 4 - - - 1 - - - - Margaret Murphy 21 " - " do - - 4 - - - 1 - 1 - - Kate Doyle 22 " - " do - - 1 - - - 1 - 1 - - Mary Reynolds 20 " - " Courtland - - 7 - - - - - - - - Joel Fuller 30 M - Brdr Massachusetts 1 - 5 Brewer 1 - - - - 1 - Elisabeth Fuller 26 F - " Chenango 1 - 1 - - - - - - - - Thos. Brigs 35 M - " do 1 - 1 Landlord 1 - - - - 1 - Sarah Brigs 30 F - " do 1 - 4m - - - - - - - - Emma Brigs 10 " - " do - - 4m - - - - - - - - W. Backus 37 M - " N.J. 1 - 1 Tailor 1 - - - - - - M. A. Backus 31 F - " New York City 1 - 1 - - - - - - - - W. H. Pearne 45 M - " England 1 - 7 Editor - 1 - - - 1 - Russell Taylor 49 " - " Otsego Co. 1 - 4 Physician 1 - - - - 1 - Abiah Taylor 44 F - " do do 1 - 4 - - - - - - - - G. J. Smith 32 " - " Georgia 1 - 6m Publisher 1 - - - - 1 - Ellen Smith 30 " - " Georgia 1 - 6m - - - - - - - - Ellen Smith 9 " - " do - - 6m - - - - - - - - Henry Smith 5 M - " do - - 6m - - - - - - - - Silas Smith 3 " - " do - - 6m - - - - - - - - Henry McKain 37 " - " N.J. 1 - 6 Enginman 1 - - - - 1 - Edward Ray 37 " - " Rhode Island 1 - 3 Artist 1 - - - - - - Susan M. Ray 30 F - " Vermont 1 - 3 - - - - - - - - James Marquissee 25 M - " Otsego 1 - 2m Merchant 1 - - - - - - Rose Marquissee 20 F - " Otsego 1 - 2m - - - - - - - - J. L. Brown 27 M - " Broome 1 - 27 Physician 1 - - - - 1 - Frank Brown 21 F - " do 1 - 21 - - - - - - - - Dan Wheeler 27 M - " do - - 27 Merchant 1 - - - - - - John Cornwall 46 " - " Conn. 1 - 4 Land Broker 1 - - - - 1 - Mary Cornwall 38 F - " do 1 - 4 - - - - - - - - R. J. Walker 23 M - " Orleans - - 1 Gentleman 1 - - - - - - G. C. Walker 23 " - " Allegany - - 5 Lawyer 1 - - - - - - Martin Hanson 19 " - " N.S. - - 1 Merchant - - - - - - - Edmond Hanson 21 " - " do - - 1 do 1 - - - - - - W. C. Waterman 22 " - " Otsego - - 1 Clerk 1 - - - - - - Erastus Ross 30 " - " Broome 1 - 18 Merchant 1 - - - - 1 - E. H. Barnam 24 " - " Greene 1 - 2 do 1 - - - - - - John G. Orton 29 " - " Broome - - 2 Physician 1 - - - - - - Gardner Ingals 49 " - " N.H. - - 1 Artist 1 - - - - 1 - Erastus Campbell 25 " - " Delaware 1 - 21 Hackman 1 - - - - 1 - Mary Whitney 42 F - " Broome - - 42 - - - - - - 1 - Emily Pike 33 " - " Conn. 1 - 1 - - - - - - - - Chas. Pike 12 M - " Weschester - - 1 - - - - - - - - John Quick 20 " - Srvt Ireland - - 12 Com. laborer - - 1 - - - - Mary Monihan 17 F - " do - - 3 - - - 1 - - - -

41 41 Dr. James H. North 36 M - Physician/Water cure New York Zelis H. " 25 F - Rhode Island Julia A. Whitney 69 F - Widow $1000 New York Elizabeth Lincoln 40 F - Mass. Moses Gibbon 28 M - Traveling agent New York Ellen " 24 F - do Frangolt Wiggornd 21 M - Gardiner Germany Kate Quinn 25 F - Servant Ireland Ann " 22 F - do do Samuel Gale 21 M - Student Conn. Stephen G. Holms 35 M - Gentleman New York Ellen Brady 38 F - Servant Ireland Elizabeth Degan 15 F - Waiter Penna. Ellen Williams 24 F - Nurse Wales

1221 1280 George Whitney 59 M - Farmer $15000 $600 N.Y. Sophia S. " 54 F - $2000 England George " 21 M - Law Student N.Y. Attended school Thomas " 19 M - do Attended school Rhoda " 13 F - do Attended school Thomas Webb 31 M - Physician England Mary Whitney 50 F - $15000 $3000 N.Y. Mary Gilroy 25 F - Servant Ireland

45 45 Whitney, Mary 59 F W House Keeping $8000 $1200 Massachusetts Madden, Mary 40 F W Domestic Servt. Ireland Parents foreign born

  • 1880, daughter Mary not found.

References


Copyright © 2006, 2007, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2016, Robert L. Ward and the Whitney Research Group.

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