Family:Whitney, Michael T. (s1800-1837)

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Michael T. Whitney, parentage unknown, was born say 1800. Montpelier, VT, and died 1837, Toledo, OH.

He married firstly, 28 Jun 1823, Meigs Co., OH, Harriet Smith.[1] She was born say 1802, and died before 1830.

He married secondly, 18 or 26 Jan 1830, Cuyahoga Co., OH, Lydia B. Smith.[2] She was born 10 Jul 1807, a died 6 Oct 1837.[3]

Charles S. Whitney is a son of Michael T. Whitney who was born in Montpelier, Vt. When a young man Mr. Whitney walked from Vermont to Olean, N.Y., in 1822, on his way West to seek his fortune. At Olean he took passage on a raft of lumber down the Allegany and Ohio Rivers, and brought up at or near Gallipolis, Ohio, where he engaged in teaching school. He married one of his scholars, Miss Harriet Smith. In 1826 he moved with his family on to a farm 3 miles west of the city of Cleveland, Ohio, which is now in the city limits. In 1832 he sold his farm and packing his goods and family into a cloth covered wagon drawn by a yoke of oxen he started again for the far west and the Indian country near the Maumee river, where now the city of Toledo is located, and where he purchased a farm of 80 acres at $1.25 per acre, then covered with timber and now part of the city. In 1835 he sold his farm and engaged in merchandising, and died in 1837. He left a family of 4 children, the oldest, Charles S. Whitney, was born Feb. 12, 1824. He having to "shuffle" for himself (with no schooling after his father's death), engaged in various pursuits, working on a farm by the year, warehouse boy, clerking in a grocery, postoffice, etc., etc., until 1848, when he started in the mercantile business for himself. In 1850 he followed the gold excitement to California, where he remained one year. In 1851 he came to Belmont, married Clara A. Parker, the daughter of A. E. Parker, was engaged a few years in general trade at Belmont with A. E. Parker, finally purchased Mr. Parker's interest, and continued the business several years alone. He was postmaster 6 years under Abraham Lincoln's administration, served 3 terms as supervisor of Amity. He gave up mercantile business and the postoffice in 1866, and has since been engaged in the oil business.[4]

In 1828 Michael D. Whitney was taxed in Brooklyn, OH, on personal property of 6 cattle, value $48, and paid $0.02 State tax, $0.02 Co. tax, $0.02 Road tax, $0.01 Town tax, $0.01 School tax, and $0.08 Total amt.[5]

In 1829, James M. Whitney and Michael T. Whitney were taxed in Brooklyn, OH, on personal property of 7 cattle, value $56, and paid $0.17 State tax, $0.15 Co. tax, $0.17 Road tax, $0.49 Total.[6]

In 1830, James M. Whitney and Michael T. Whitney were taxed in Brooklyn, OH, apparently jointly, on Range 13 Town 7 Sections 9, N.W.C., and 10, E. End, 75 acres, value $354, $1.24 State tax, $1.33 County school, $1.06 Road tax, $0.35 Town tax, $2.28 total tax [sic].[7]

In 1830, James M. Whitney and Michael T. Whitney were taxed in Brooklyn, OH, apparently jointly, on Range 13 Town 7 Sections 9, N.W.C., and 10, E. End, 75 acres, value $354, $1.06 State tax, $.97 County school, $1.06 Road tax, $3.09 total tax.[8]

In 1830, Michael T. Whitney was taxed in Brooklyn, OH, on personal property of 5 cattle, value $40, and paid $0.14 State tax, $0.15 Co. tax, $0.12 Road tax, $0.04 Town tax, $0.45 total tax.[9]

In 1831, James M. Whitney and Michael T. Whitney were taxed in Brooklyn, OH, apparently jointly, on Range 13 Town 7 Sections 9, N.W.C., and 10, E. End, 75 acres, value $350, $1.23 State tax, $1.05 County school, $1.00 Road tax, $3.33 total tax.[10]

In 1831, Michael T. Whitney was taxed in Brooklyn, OH, on personal property of 6 cattle, value $48, and paid $0.16 State tax, $0.14 Co. tax, $0.14 Road tax, $0.44 Total.[11]

The resident heads of families, January 1, 1832, embraced within the limits of what was then Port Lawrence township, comprising what is not the city, Washington township, Manhattan, Oregon, and a part of Adams township, were as follows: In the city limits, north side of the river, ... Michael T. Whitney, ....[12]

The fifth [store] was also at Tremainesville, built by Sanford L. Collins, in connection with a small dwelling, which he occupied for his residence, in 1833, and occupied that Fall with a stock of Goods, which he brought by water from New York. In 1834, Mr. Collins took in as partners, his brothers, John W. and Morgan L. Collins, the firm being S. L. Collins & Co., and so continuing to 1837, when they sold out to Horace Thacher and M. T. Whitney. Mr. Collins succeeded Mr. Tremaine in the Postoffice, which, in 1833, had been changed in name to Tremainesville, upon the establishment of Port Lawrence Postoffice at Port Lawrence.[13]

TRANSFERS OF REAL ESTATE: Henry Phillips and Sanford L. Collins to Michael T. Whitney, November, 1836, one-third interest in 78 lots in the Village of Fairfield on the Indiana Road, the plat of which was recorded June 1836. Philip I. Phillips to Horace Thacher and Michael T. Whitney.[14]

He had horses, cattle, and hogs in Toledo.[15]

On 10 Dec 1860, a suit was brought by Kimball and others versus Whitney and others, in the Lagrange County, IN, court, about debts due by Thatcher and Whitney to Kimball, Collins, etc. This eventually reached the Supreme Court of Indiana. The object of the suit was to reach some property which belonged to Michael T. Whitney, in his lifetime, and now in the hands of his heirs, and apply it to the satisfaction of claims due the plaintiffs from said Michael T. Whitney and Horace Thatcher, the latter of whom had become bankrupt. No letters of administration had been taken out upon the estate of Whitney, deceased. Henry P. and Charles Corliss came in under the bill, and set up a claim in their favor, on a judgment rendered against Whitney and Thatcher in the Court of Common Pleas of Lucas County, Ohio. Samuel L. Collins also set up a claim upon a note made by Thatcher and Whitney, payable to S. L. Collins & Co., for $984.86, dated July 21, 1837, and alleged to have been sold and transferred by S. L. Collins & Col., to said Samuel L. Collins. Alfred, William H., and Edward Willis, also set up a claim in their favor, upon a judgment recovered by them against Whitney and Thatcher, in the Court of Common Pleas of Lucas county, Ohio, on April 30, 1838. The defendants, heirs of Michael T. Whitney, deceased, appeared and answered. The cause was tried by jury, who found for the defendants, except as to the claim of the Willises, and for them the amount of their claim.[16]

Children of Michael T. and Harriet (Smith) Whitney:

i. Charles Smith Whitney, b. 12 Feb 1824, Gallipolis, OH; m.(1) Clara Adriana Parker; m.(2) Mary E. (Williams) White; m.(3) Sarah E. -----; m.(3) Bridget Toomey.
ii. (daughter) Whitney, b. 1825-1830; d. aft. 1837.

Children of Michael T. Whitney, maternity uncertain:

iii. (child) Whitney, b. aft. 1830; d. aft. 1837.
iv. (child) Whitney, b. aft. 1830; d. aft. 1837.

Notes

The James M. Whitney who owned the adjacent lot in Brooklyn, OH, was very likely a relative, possibly a brother. He was no longer in Brooklyn at the time of the 1830 census.

Census

References

1.^  Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013, at FamilySearch.org.

2.^  Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013, at FamilySearch.org.

3.^  Whitney Family Tree, a public tree at Ancestry.com.

4.^  Minard, John Stearns, and Georgia Drew Merrill, eds., Allegany County and it People: A Centennial Memorial History (W.A. Fergusson & Company, 1896), pp. 472-473.

5.^  Ohio Tax Records, 1800-1850, at FamilySearch.org.

6.^  Ohio Tax Records, 1800-1850, at FamilySearch.org.

7.^  Ohio Tax Records, 1800-1850, at FamilySearch.org.

8.^  Ohio Tax Records, 1800-1850, at FamilySearch.org.

9.^  Ohio Tax Records, 1800-1850, at FamilySearch.org.

10.^  Ohio Tax Records, 1800-1850, at FamilySearch.org.

11.^  Ohio Tax Records, 1800-1850, at FamilySearch.org.

12.^  Knapp, Horace S., History of the Maumee Valley: Commencing with Its Occupation by the French in 1680, (1877: Toledo), p. 616.

13.^  Waggoner, Clark, ed., History of the City of Toledo and Lucas County, Ohio, Illustrated, (1888:Munsell & Company, Publishers, New York and Toledo), p. 757.

14.^  Waggoner, Clark, ed., History of the City of Toledo and Lucas County, Ohio, Illustrated, (1888:Munsell & Company, Publishers, New York and Toledo), p. 901.

15.^ Waggoner, Clark, ed., History of the City of Toledo and Lucas County, Ohio, Illustrated, (1888:Munsell & Company, Publishers, New York and Toledo), p. 905.

16.^  Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Court of Court of Judicature of the State of Indiana, Volume 15, pp. 281-286.


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