Family:Whitney, Robert (1348-1402)

From WRG
Jump to: navigation, search

Robert Whitney (Robert, Eustace, Eustace, Robert, ...), son of Robert de Whitney,[1] was born 1348, Whitney, Herefordshire,[2] and died (prob. 22 Jun) 1402, near Pilleth, Radnorshire.[3]

He married Janet Trussell.[4]

He married Maud/Mary Cromwell, born 1352, daughter of Sir Ralph and Maud (Bernake) Cromwell.[5]

Sir Robert Whitney of Whitney, etc., Knight. Sent abroad to negotiate treaty with Count of Flanders in 1388. Member of Parliament for Herefordshire in 1391. Sent to France to deliver Castle and Town of Cherbourg to King of Navarre in 1393. Knight Marshal at the Court of Richard II. Sent on the King's business to Ireland in 1394. Killed, together with his brother and most of his relatives at the battle of Pilleth in 1402.[6]

"But there are clear signs in other counties of J.P.s being appointed for political reasons in these closing years when Richard II was also manipulating his men into the shrievalties. The commission of the peace for neighboring Herefordshire issued on 27 July 1397, shortly after Richard had moved against the former Appellant lords, numbered two esquires of the household, Robert Witney and Thomas Clanvow, among its ten members. (Cal. Pat. Rolla 1396-9, p. 227; cf. E.101/403/22 (Wardrobe Book, 16-17 Richard II).) Witney ad Clanvow remained J.P.s until the accession of Henry IV [1399] when they were both removed." - Knights and Esquires

See Archive:E 101/69/1/285 and Archive:E 101/320/18.

Children of Robert and Janet (Trussell) Whitney:

i. Joan Whitney,[7] b. say 1375;[8] m. 1) William Walwyn,[9] m. 2) William Weldon.
Ch: Margaret Walwyn, d. 1450, m. 1) John Parles, m. 2) Robert Catesby; John Walwyn of Longford; Christian Walwyn, m. Thomas Knyvett. (Foundations 3:2)

Children of Robert and Maud (Cromwell) de Whitney:

i. Sir Robert Whitney,[10] b. about 1379;[11] m. Wenllian Oldcastle.[12]

Children of Robert Whitney and an unknown wife (or one of the above):

i. Thomas Whitney,[13] One of the "lances" in the retinue of the Duke of Gloucester at the Battle of Agincourt in 1415. Granted an estate in France, for his services, by Henry V. in 1419.[14] He was perhaps the "Sir Thomas Whitney", father of Peryn Whitney, b. say 1415, who m. as his 3rd wife, John Abrahall, b. ca. 1406. Children: William Abrahall, b. 1437, d. 1487, of Eaton Tregoz.[15] He was possibly the Thomas Whitney, father of Isabeau de Hutenay, the wife of Guillaume Maillart. (see here).
ii. Peryne Whitney,[16] b. say 1373,[17] d. aft. 1422,[18] married say fall of 1393[19] Sir Thomas Clanvowe, whom Brusendorff and Ward conclued was the author of the early English poem The Cuckoo and the Nightingale.[20] The will of Peryn Clanbowe, dated 1422, has been obtained. She requested to be buried next to her husband in Yazor, Herefordshire.
Oct. 2, 1392, Woodstock Manor. Grant, for their lives in survivorship, to Thomas Clanvowe, esquire of the king, and Perrin Wytteneye, his wife, one of the damsels of the queen's chamber, of the 10l. a year from the manor of Tydderley, co. Southampton, which the king lately granted to her for life by letters patent now surrendered; with the consent of the said Perrin. Vacated by surrender and cancelled, because the king granted to them 20l. for their lives, and to the said Thomas 40 marks a year for his life from the fee farm of the castle and cantred of Built? 12 August in his eighteenth year.[21]
The day after Ascension, 7 Henry [V] [26 May 1419]. And afterwards one week from Holy Trinity in the same year [18 June 1419]. Parties: Roger Bodenham, esquire, John Boderell' and John Fox, querents, and Nicholas Wylkys and Joan, his wife, deforciants. Property: 4 messuages, 100 acres of land, 6 acres of meadow, 5 acres of wood, 4 acres of pasture and 55 shillings of rent, and the rent of a fourth part of 1 pound of pepper and a moiety of a fourth part of 1 pound of cumin in Kyngespewne, Lastres and Brethwaldestrue. Action: Plea of covenant. Agreement: Nicholas and Joan have acknowledged the tenements and rent to be the right of John Fox, of which the same John, Roger and John Boderell' have 2 messuages, 54 acres of land, 4 acres of meadow, 3 acres of wood and 2 acres of pasture of the gift of Nicholas and Joan, and have granted to Roger, John and John the rent, together with the homage and all services of the prior of Wormeslay and his successors, Thomas Barton', Elizabeth Hevyn', John Hull' and John Poly and their heirs in respect of all the tenements which they held before of Nicholas and Joan in the aforesaid vills, to hold to Roger, John Boderell' and John Fox and the heirs of John Fox, of the chief lords for ever. And besides Nicholas and Joan granted for themselves and the heirs of Joan that 2 messuages, 46 acres of land, 2 acres of meadow, 2 acres of wood and 2 acres of pasture in the aforesaid vill of Kyngespewne - which Perina (Peryn(e)), who was the wife of Thomas Glanvowe, knight, held for life of the inheritance of Joan on the day the agreement was made, and which after her decease ought to revert to Nicholas and Joan and the heirs of Joan - after the decease of Perina shall remain to Roger, John and John and the heirs of John Fox, to hold of the chief lords for ever. Warranty: Warranty. For this: Roger, John and John have given them 200 marks of silver.[22]

Notes

He was probably the Sir Robert Whitney, a king's knight and harbinger of the household who lent support to the lollard preacher William Swinderby - Richard II. Other knights connected to the new lay movement included Sir John Trussell, Sir John Oldcastle, and Sir John Clanvow. - Church and People. For more of Swinderby, see Who's who in Late Medieval England, 1272-1485.

References

1. ^  Source for relationship between Robert and Robert Whitney.

2. ^  Source for birth information for Robert Whitney.

3. ^  Source for death information for Robert Whitney.

4. ^  Source for marriage information for Robert and Janet.

5. ^  www.tudorplace.com.

6. ^  Melville, Henry, A.M., LL.B., The Ancestry of John Whitney: Who, with His Wife Elinor, and Sons John, Richard, Nathaniel, Thomas, and Jonathan, Emigrated from London, England, in the Year 1635, and Settled in Watertown, Massachusetts; the First of the Name in America, and the One from Whom a Great Majority of the Whitneys Now Living in the United States Are Descended (New York, NY: The De Vinne Press, 1896), Chart between pp. 216-217.

7. ^  Source for relationship between Joan and Robert Whitney.

8. ^  Source for birth information for Joan Whitney.

9. ^  Source for death information for Joan Whitney.

10. ^  Source for relationship between Robert and Robert Whitney.

11. ^  Source for birth information for Robert Whitney.

12. ^  Source for death information for Robert Whitney.

13. ^  Melville, Henry, A.M., LL.B., The Ancestry of John Whitney: Who, with His Wife Elinor, and Sons John, Richard, Nathaniel, Thomas, and Jonathan, Emigrated from London, England, in the Year 1635, and Settled in Watertown, Massachusetts; the First of the Name in America, and the One from Whom a Great Majority of the Whitneys Now Living in the United States Are Descended (New York, NY: The De Vinne Press, 1896), chart near p. 216.

14. ^  Melville, Henry, A.M., LL.B., The Ancestry of John Whitney: Who, with His Wife Elinor, and Sons John, Richard, Nathaniel, Thomas, and Jonathan, Emigrated from London, England, in the Year 1635, and Settled in Watertown, Massachusetts; the First of the Name in America, and the One from Whom a Great Majority of the Whitneys Now Living in the United States Are Descended (New York, NY: The De Vinne Press, 1896), chart near p. 216.

15. ^  The Visitation of the County of Gloucester: Taken in the Year 1623 By John Philipot, William Camden, College of Arms (Great Britain), Henry Chitting, John Maclean, p. 201.

16. ^  Source for relationship between Peryn and Robert Whitney.

17. ^  Source for birth information for Peryn Whitney.

18. ^  Source for death information for Peryn Whitney.

19. ^  Ward, C.E. (of Duke University)"The Authorship of the Cuckoo and the Nightingale", Modern Language Notes, Vol. 44, No. 4(April 1929) Published by Johns Hopkins University, pp. 217-225. "Thomas, who might have been wooing Perrin Whitteneye in 1391 or 1392, was at this time between 31 and 45 years of age."

20. ^  Archive:Engaging Words: The Culture of Reading in the Later Middle Ages, p. 29. For the identification of Thomas Clanvowe as husband of Peryne Whitney, see also, The Age of Transition, 1400-1580 By Frederick John Snell London: 1905 and Shaping the Nation: England 1360 - 1461 By Gerald Harriss (Clarendon Press: Oxford pp. 394). See also, Ward, C.E. supra.

21. ^  Calendar of Patent Rolls, p. 185, 16 Richard II. - Part II, Membrane 24

22. ^  Court of Common Pleas, General Eyres and Court of King's Bench: Herefordshire: Feet of fines for 1-10 Hen V: 1-19, CP 25/1/83/53, number 13. See also http://www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/fines/abstracts/CP_25_1_83_53.shtml#13


Copyright © 2006-2008, Robert L. Ward. Tim Doyle and the Whitney Research Group

Personal tools