Mailing List:1998-08-05 02, Some Whitney material from Ancestry's free Vt. item, by Marcia Whitney Green

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Mailing List Archives > 1998-08-05 02, Some Whitney material from Ancestry's free Vt. item, by Marcia Whitney Green

From: Marcia <mwverde -at- concentric.net> Subject: Some Whitney material from Ancestry's free Vt. item Date: Wed, 05 Aug 1998 17:27:10 -0700 Men of Vermont: An Illustrated Biographical History of Vermonters and Sons of Vermont. [p.1] BIOGRAPHIES OF VERMONTERS A. D. 1892-93. Mr. Dillon was married Dec. 15, 1880, to Belle M., daughter of G. M. and Mary S. (Putnam) Whitney of Middlesex. They have one child living: Grace E. A son, Paul, died Feb. 13, 1890. -- Men of Vermont: An Illustrated Biographical History of Vermonters and Sons of Vermont. [p.1] BIOGRAPHIES OF VERMONTERS A. D. 1892-93. He wedded, March 26, 1879, Miss Ella F., daughter of David H. and Fidelia (Thresher) Whitney of Granville. Their marriage has been blessed with three children: Bessie Ethel, Lula Miriam, and Annie Louise. -- Men of Vermont: An Illustrated Biographical History of Vermonters and Sons of Vermont. [p.1] BIOGRAPHIES OF VERMONTERS A. D. 1892-93. Mr. Putnam was united in marriage, October, 1868, to Mary E., daughter of Abel and Mary Whitney, of Middlesex, who died four years after their union. For his second wife he wedded, Sept. 22, 1874, Jennie, daughter of Medad and Mary Jane (McIntyre) Wright, of Montpelier. Two children have been born to them: Ralph W., and Eula W. -- Men of Vermont: An Illustrated Biographical History of Vermonters and Sons of Vermont. PART III BIOGRAPHIES OF SONS OF VERMONT Whitney, Henry Douglas, of Bridgeport, Conn., son of Henry and Almira J. (Bowker) Whitney, was born in Wilmington, Sept. 13, 1866. Mr. Whitney began the study of law in 1888 in the office of Bates & May of St. Johnsbury and went to Chattanooga, Tenn., in the fall of 1889, there entering the office of Russell & Daniels, a leading law firm of that city. The following year he was admitted to the bar, and has since pursued an active and successful career. Mr. Whitney's literary abilities and tastes have found expression in a legal work, "Whitney's Land Laws of Tennesee." This work has received the highest endorsement of both bench and bar and has become a standard on the subject of Tennessee land laws. -- HENRY DOUGLAS WHITNEY. Men of Vermont: An Illustrated Biographical History of Vermonters and Sons of Vermont. PART III BIOGRAPHIES OF SONS OF VERMONT In politics Mr. Whitney is an independent Democrat, and in religion a free thinker. He was married in Wilmington, June 6, 1890, to Kate J., daughter of Judge George C. and Rebecca Todd Harrison of West Cornwall, Conn. To her large helpfulness and encouragement he owes much of his success. One son, Burke Emerson, born Feb. 1, 1894, has come to their home. -- Men of Vermont: An Illustrated Biographical History of Vermonters and Sons of Vermont. PART III BIOGRAPHIES OF SONS OF VERMONT Whitney, Samuel Brenton,of Boston, Mass., son of Samuel and Amelia (Hyde) Whitney, was born in Woodstock, June 4, 1842. His early education was obtained in the public schools. He afterwards attended the Vermont Episcopal Institute, studied music first with local teachers, afterwards with Carl Wels and later still with John K. Paine, taking lessons on the organ, pianoforte, composition and instrumentation. Men of Vermont: An Illustrated Biographical History of Vermonters and Sons of Vermont. PART III BIOGRAPHIES OF SONS OF VERMONT page 171 Mr. Whitney has been organist and director of music of Christ Church, Montpelier; St. Peter's, Albany, N. Y., and St. Paul's Church, Burlington; is at present and has been for the past twenty-two years, organist of the Church of the Advent, Boston, the choir of which church has become quite celebrated under [p.171] his direction. He has frequently been engaged as conductor of choir festival associations in Massachusetts and Vermont; is first vice-president and one of the organ examiners of the American College of Musicians; has written church music quite extensively, also piano and miscellaneous music. He has been conductor of many choral societies in and around Boston, and has the reputation of being very successful in training and developing boys' voices. In this position he has heen identified with liturgical music, vested choirs, and a reverent performance of church music. The late Dr. J. H. Wilcox once said in this connection, after hearing Mr. Whitney play a very small organ: "It takes a much more gifted organist to play a small organ than it does to play a large one, where every resource is at hand." Another musical authority in Boston has said: "Mr. Whitney, by his wonderful mastery of the preludes, fugues and toccatas of Bach, most of which are so impressed upon his remarkable memory that he rarely uses notes; by his style so brilliant and pleasing, and his improvisations so solid and rich, has won much credit in and beyond professional circles." Mr. Whitney was for a time teacher of the organ in the New England Conservatory of Music. He also established in this institution for the first time, a church music class, in which not only were the vocal pupils taught how to properly interpret sacred music, but the organ pupils as well were instructed as to the management of the organ in church. Among Mr. Whitney's compositions are a trio for piano and string, many solos and arrangements for both piano and organ, as well as several church services, Te Deums and miscellaneous anthems and songs, both sacred and secular. Some of Mr. Whitney's organ compositions have been reprinted in England, by London publishers.


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