Family:Whitney, William (s1529-a1590)

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William Whitney, Esq. (Robert, James, Robert, Eustace, Robert, Robert, Robert, Eustace, Eustace, Robert, ...), son of Robert and Margaret (Wye) Whitney,[1] was born say 1529, Icomb, Gloucestershire,[2] and died after 1590.[3]

William was bequeathed land in Great Rissington in his father's will, dated 1541:[4]

Also I bequethe to my sonne William when he comythe to the age of XXIIII yeres my lease and ferme called the Chauntery landes in Greate Ryssinton wt the Indenture of the same Remaynyng in my Caskett at Icombe aforesaide wt foure hundred wethers at that age or the price of them as they shalbe praysed in the Inventarye and in the meane tyme my wife to take the proffittes of the same ferme.

He was probably the "William Whittney", plaintiff in a Chancery suit against Richard Lylley in 1567. On 5 Feb 1567, Richard Lylley had not made his answer to the William Whittney's bill of complaint, even though a previous order had been issued. Because of this, the Sheriff of Gloucester was notified.[5]

About 1567, William was involved in a Star Chamber suit.[6]

Richard Lylley of Stow, Gloucester claimed that William Whitney, Gent., of Icomb along with his brother George Whitney, Gent. and many others (about 80 in total) had on 15 July 1567 assembled at the Upper Swell Manor's mansion house with various weapons to try to gain entry. Richard Lylley, William and Johan Foxe, along with their children, servants, and friends were trapped inside. He claimed that the rioters had used mining instruments to try to undermine part of the house and had threatened to burn it down. The 'rioters' stayed for about three weeks, not letting anyone in or out, and Lylley suggested they were trying to starve them out. The group was forced to drink rain water and to eat verinyse (vermin?). The group in the house finally relented and left, leaving all of their possessions.
Richard Lylley complained to the Justices of Assize who then issued a warrant for the arrest of George Whitney, William Whitney, and Richard George. A bailiff attempted to arrest George Whitney and then Richard George, both of whom managed to slip away. Finally, he was able to arrest George Whitney, who grabbed the bailiff and beat him, then was able to escape.
Because of the social status of the individuals involved, Richard Lylley requested the Court of Star Chamber to subpoena the Whitneys. Because the Bill of Complaint is the only document in the suit which has been found, the results of the complaint are not known.

William was mentioned in a Barons' Deposition of Richard Bryan of Icomb, dated 1590.[7]

To the 5[th interrogatory] he sayeth Mr Johnson talked w[i]th this depo[nent] when he was att Widford touchinge Mr Whytney and concerninge his land[es] in great Risington and littell Barrington but what he then said this depo[nent] remembreth not neyther remembrth this depo[nent] what Mr Johnson said touchinge the said Mr Whitney his said dealing[es] w[i]th this depo[nent] in and about the said land[es] yett he sayeth he talked w[i]th this depo[nent] aboute the same and sayd that Mr lea and he would buy Mr Whytneys interrest and this is all he remembreth touchinge these matters.

Because William was listed in connection with the land at Great Rissington, it is clear that this was almost certainly the same man. In the 1590 deposition, he is listed as "William Whitney, Esq. of Broadwell".

References

1.^  Henry Melville, The Ancestry of John Whitney: Who, with His Wife Elinor, and Sons John, Richard, Nathaniel, Thomas, and Jonathan, Emigrated from London, England, in the Year 1635, and Settled in Watertown, Massachusetts; the First of the Name in America, and the One from Whom a Great Majority of the Whitneys Now Living in the United States Are Descended (New York, NY: The De Vinne Press, 1896), pp. 265, 269, 271, 275.

2. ^ 

3. ^  E 133/7/971

4. ^  Henry Melville, A.M., LL.B., The Ancestry of John Whitney: Who, with His Wife Elinor, and Sons John, Richard, Nathaniel, Thomas, and Jonathan, Emigrated from London, England, in the Year 1635, and Settled in Watertown, Massachusetts; the First of the Name in America, and the One from Whom a Great Majority of the Whitneys Now Living in the United States Are Descended (New York, NY: The De Vinne Press, 1896), p. 137.

5. ^  C 33/35, Chancery Entry Book of Decrees and Orders, 1567, f. 401 verso.

6. ^  STAC 5/L29/37

7. ^  E 133/7/971


Copyright © 2008 Tim Doyle and the Whitney Research Group

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